Time for me to switch to using a different IDE for C++ cross platform development

dawlane

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When it comes to cross platform development with C++, my weapon of choice used to be Codeblocks. But alas it's got to the point where it's starting to become more annoying than a help, with wxSmith being flaky, certain features being disabled with them being buggy and the Mac OS port stuck three versions behind.

So for the last few days I've been trying out Eclipse CDT Version: 2020-09 (4.17.0). I've tried using previous version, but found them lacking on the distribution of project settings and a few features.

This version of the IDE has a bit of a learning curve, probably not so different from previous versions, with figuring out the changes, how it integrates with the installed system tool chains and the best way to import existing code and I've still got to see what it's like to distribute workspace and project preferences. But once you get used to it, it's not to bad of an IDE to use with all the little goodies for code management and viewing. Plus it can be expanded to use other languages via plugins. Like all open open source IDE's, it has a few quirks, like the Windows version complaining if you've selected to install java 15 instead of java 14 with the Eclipse installer and there could be a few more that i haven't discovered yet on the supported operating systems.

I also like the JetBrains IDE's, but a few of them have no community editions and focus on supporting certain tool chain versions, i.e. the latest clang may not be the latest supported. Maybe one day I will be tempted to part with the cash and buy CLion.
 
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MikeHart

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To me these IDEs always felt overwelming. That is probably why I never got into Jungle in the first place. I feel more comfortable with simple editors. Heck I even felt fine with Monkeys first editor called Monk.
 

dawlane

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To me these IDEs always felt overwelming. That is probably why I never got into Jungle in the first place.
Yes they can always feel overwhelming and a chore to deal with. With the amount of bloat that some of them have and with setting things up. Especially those that target multiple devices and build environments.

To me a good IDE should do most of the work for you to set up it's tool chain settings. Have simple, intuitive project and IDE settings, as well as code overview and support for version control. A real bonus is one that comes with a detailed user manual and programming guide. Coding in tools such as XCode and Visual Studio require an hour or so of relearning if I've not used them for sometime. And are possibly the worst offenders with the amount of settings and coding tools you have to deal with.

The problem with some of these simple IDE's is that they are not much better than a text editor and it's up to the end user to set everything else up. Or they are too limited in control functionality for setting up tool chains that you wish to use.
 
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dawlane

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Well kicking myself this morning. Spent a few hours last night searching the net and trying to work out why executing a prebuild script wasn't working in Eclipse, only for me to realise this morning that I hadn't set the scripts file permission to execute. :oops:

So far the best way to use Eclipse is via creating a git repository and importing it. The EGit plugin looks to be very functional, but you still have to do a few steps as you would do from the command line i.e. Add Submodule then sync.

My one gripe is that the documents are on the scattered side, not detailed enough and still leaves the end use to fill in the blanks. Plus some of the settings will not use the built in variable expansion as arguments. Which then forces you to go looking for the answers on the forums were the same question was asked years ago and never answered.

Someone must be a bit of a masochist.;)
 

dawlane

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this is a niece piece of software too Codelite
Are you sure your not a masochist.

I've test out virtually all IDE's and programmers text editors. And Codelite and Geany are in the " they are not much better than a text editor and it's up to the end user to set everything else up. Or they are too limited in control functionality for setting up tool chains that you wish to use." category.
 

c0d3r9

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I just used codelite for little C projects and i find it nice because its not that big like vs studio.
 
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